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Albert Camus

Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.

Monday, September 7, 2015

Yell and Shout Cry and Pout: A Kid’s Guide to Feelings by Peggy Kruger Tietz

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid's Guide to Feelings is an essential guidebook for adults in steering children through the confusing behaviors that emotions evoke. When you understand the purpose of emotions, behavior becomes understandable

Description:

Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid's Guide to Feelings is an essential guidebook for adults in steering children through the confusing behaviors that emotions evoke. When you understand the purpose of emotions, behavior becomes understandable. Each of the eight emotions is clearly defined thorough vignettes and illustrations, keeping both adult and child captivated, thus creating an opportune time for discussion. By recognizing that all humans experience these emotions throughout their lives, the book provides a true sense of comfort. Emotions are not to be shunned, but rather embraced and explained to provide a positive development environment for all children.

GUEST POST
Are There Bad Emotions?

I became intrigued by this question when I was writing my book, Yell and Shout, Cry and Pout: A Kid's Guide to Feelings. I shared a common belief that some emotions were good and others bad; some wanted and some not. Even the Dalai Lama has a book out entitled Destructive Emotions. When we think of an emotion like anger, we know that unbridled anger can turn into rage and the intensity of that anger can be dangerous. We can conjure up all kinds of violent physical acts that result from extreme anger. But does that make anger a bad emotion? Certainly it can cause destruction, but what about anger's positive attributes. It can helps us defend ourselves against threats or alert us to unfairness. It can motivate us to stand up against oppression or fight against social wrongs.

Anything taken to an extreme is potentially dangerous. Thoughts, as well as emotions, can be harmful. Negative self thoughts can erode our self esteem. Negative evaluations about a group, with beliefs different from ours, can lead to conflict.

So, yes, emotions taken to an extreme are problematic. And certain emotions are more likely to cause problems than others. If I think about the myth of Pandora's Box, it is the emotions that she released from the box that are the ones that will cause suffering for mankind: envy, jealously, hate, and greed. 

But even our least attractive emotions don't have to be negative. They're there for a reason, to let us know something disturbing has happened to us. Feeling envious, for example, might indicate wanting something someone else has. That twinge of envy can increase our effort toward achieving something useful or beneficial for ourselves. It's how we respond to our emotions that makes the difference. Emotions are only problematic when we don't stop and think and consciously decide how we want to act. The problem is emotional reactivity: acting without thinking. When we can be aware of our emotions, and then pause to let our thinking brain help us out ,we can make measured and wise choices about how to act.

Emotions are neutral. It's how we react to them that creates good or bad behavior. My book can be an aid to learn more about the purpose of each of our basic emotions, and to see their positive value in helping us meet life's challenges.

About the author:
Dr. Peggy Kruger Tietz is a licensed psychologist and maintains a private practice in Austin, Texas. She sees a wide range of children with normal developmental problems as well as children who have experienced trauma. Her Ph.D is in developmental psychology from Bryn Mawr College. Before entering private practice Dr. Tietz treated children in multiple settings, such as family service agencies and foster care. Dr. Tietz, trained at the Family Institute of Philadelphia, and then taught there. She specializes in seeing children individually, as well as, with their families. She has advanced training in Play Therapy as well as being a certified practitioner of EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, for children and adults). She has conducted workshops on parenting, sibling relationships, and emotional literacy. 

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