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Albert Camus

Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

lives, loves, and losses - More More Time by David B Seaburn

Maxwell Ruth, a cantankerous, old high school history teacher falls down his basement stairs and soon thereafter starts hearing “The Words” over and over again--- endingtimeendingtimeendingtime. His life is changed forever.

Description:

Maxwell Ruth, a cantankerous, old high school history teacher falls down his basement stairs and soon thereafter starts hearing “The Words” over and over again--- endingtimeendingtimeendingtime. His life is changed forever.

In this story we learn about the lives, loves, and losses of Max, Hargrove and Gwen Stinson, Beth and Bob Hazelwood, and Constance Young. They are lively, funny, at times; a little bit lost or wounded, yet resilient and hopeful. They are wrestling with life’s most challenging issues, including, abuse, loss, infidelity, aging, secrecy and what gives life meaning. And, like all of us, they would like more, more time to find the answers to life’s most important questions. The clock, though, is always ticking and time is always short. 

GUEST POST
What Inspires Your Writing?

There are often specific experiences that help inspire my writing. For example, the title for my latest novel, “More More Time,” was inspired by a game I used to play with our oldest granddaughter. I would hold her by the wrists and swish her around the kitchen floor. When I got tired, I would say, “One more time, Gianna.” She thought I was saying, “More more time,” which, in turn, she assumed was the name of the game. Almost immediately, I decided that would be the title of my next novel even though I didn’t have a story to go with it yet.

When I get into the actual writing, I discover that there are more fundamental things that motivate or inspire me. They have to do with my theological training and my years of experience as a marriage and family therapist. In theological seminary I learned that story-telling, the use of language, is a powerful way to create and sustain meaning. In fact, the process of story creation and sharing is sacred, in and of itself. 

As I psychotherapist I was afforded the opportunity to enter into the intimate stories of individuals, couples and families, stories that were honest, painful, and yet full of hope. Listening to and struggling with them taught me about the complexity of the human journey and all the challenges and rewards that are a part of it. It also taught me that even the most modest life is brimful of meaning and possibility. 

As a consequence of these influences, common to all my work is an abiding interest in the common struggles that make us human---loss, fear, hope, uncertainty, connection, separation, meaning, seeking, questioning, love, guilt, wonder, and joy. When I write, I feel that more than anything else, I am, even in a small way, trying to make sense of life, trying to explore its meaning. And, of course, I am trying to tell a good story in the process. 

About the author:
David B. Seaburn served a rural country parish, worked in community mental health, was an assistant professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center for twenty years, and also directed a free public school-based family counseling center before his retirement in 2010. He has written five novels: More More Time (2015), Chimney Bluffs (2012), Charlie No Face (2011—Finalist in General Fiction, National Indie Excellence Awards), Pumpkin Hill (2007), and Darkness is as Light (2005). He and his wife live near Rochester, NY. They have two adult daughters and two wonderful granddaughters.


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