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Albert Camus

Don't walk behind me; I may not lead. Don't walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

"I hate when Dad's right." - Travels with Penny by David Alan Morrison

Two things flashed through my mind when I opened the door to the sex shop to find my mother standing in front of the display case talking to a tall salesman wearing a leather harness, jock strap and a dog collar. The first was, "Oh, crap." The second was, "I hate when Dad's right."

Description:

Publication Date: April 2015

Two things flashed through my mind when I opened the door to the sex shop to find my mother standing in front of the display case talking to a tall salesman wearing a leather harness, jock strap and a dog collar. The first was, "Oh, crap." The second was, "I hate when Dad's right."

Following the sudden death of his father, a single, middle-aged gay guy struggles with his own mortality be reminiscing about the travels with his gregarious mother. It is a look at the transformation of the baffling, complex relationship between children and their parents.

GUEST POST
GLBT Literature

The most important lesson about becoming an out LGBT author happened because I got old.

Mind you, being a LGBT author in the 21st century is a heck of a lot different than when I was a fledgling student studying writing. I came out during Reagan's Rein Of Terror. I came out before the internet, Twitter and Queer As Folk. I came out when just BEING a LGBT author was a political statement.

The first element of the story: When I watched The Celluloid Closet, the fantastic documentary about being queer in Hollywood. The interviews contained a statement by Harvey Fierstein. When asked about his opinion of the "Sissy" in early Hollywood movies, he responded with, "I always liked the Sissy. At least people saw us." I hated his response. I felt it apologetic, weak-willed and conceding to society's norms.

The second element happened when I was hired to pen a story for a Fan Fiction magazine. This particular magazine featured "X" rated stories featuring the two guys from the '80's TV show "Simon and Simon". I loved the show and lusted after both the actors. Writing erotica about them was no problem. What bothered me was that the fan 'zine (as we called them) was owned by two women, with stories written by women. I was to be the first male (let along gay male) to be an author with them. Women hiring women to write erotic fantasies about men sat wrong with me. The political anarchist within screamed "FOUL!" Erotic fiction for men is the realm of men. Period.

Then I turned 40.

I started having a crisis of consciousness and faith. I looked back on my life and wondered what happened to me. I hadn't become a best selling novelist, I hadn't starred in a hit TV show, I hadn't even been able to plan for my retirement. I looked around at the world I lived in and noticed - as if for the first time - how society had changed. Gay characters were not limited to flaming gay guys. LGBT fiction was sold online as well as in mainstream bookstores. Bars were not longer the domain of either MEN or WOMEN, but enjoyed by a whole cross-section of our culture.

We were not living in the shadows that I had become accustomed to.

That's when it hit me: we're not in Kansas anymore.

The LGBT world of the new Millennium is vastly different world than when I first saw The Celluloid Closet or wrote that 'zine fiction erotica. The world has seen more of our community than just the Sissy. Most straight folks have met Bears, Leather Folk, trans-folk, veterans, femmes, butches and straight drag queens. 

Each of these groups is a part of who we are as LGBT people. 

So I care very little these days about who writes what about the LGBT community. I care less about whether something is Politically Correct or not based upon the story-teller. All I care about is we see each other for who we are: people. People hoping to be happy. People hoping to find love, or a job, or that perfect apartment. People who are flawed, maddening, hysterical and stoic. People who deserve to have their stories told. People who have a right to pursue their own version of happiness. 


About the author:

Dave Morrison (CI & CT, NIC-A, SC:L, NAD-5). Dave received his A.A. in ASL/ENG Interpreting from L.A. Pierce College in 1989. In 2000, he obtained his M.A. in Theatre Arts from the University of Kentucky. He has interpreted in a variety of venues, from the courtroom to funerals to underwater conservation forums. As an actor, he has been seen on stage, TV and film. 

He is currently an adjunct instructor of Drama at Skagit Valley College and works with local theatres as a director, actor and instructor.

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2 comments:

Good Tales Book Tours said...

Hi!

Thank you so much for hosting today! We sure do appreciate your support!

Laurie Starkey
Good Tales Book Tours

D.A.M. Morrison said...

Thank you for the attention on my book. You do important work. I appreciate it very much. I hope your readers enjoy it also